Production Expectations

Regardless of the decoration method, orders have to be produced.
The most important piece of information for an order is the ship date. For production, this means scheduling the work so it is complete one business day before the job is supposed to leave the building.

The expectation is that Production will do what it takes to ensure that this is a reality. That often is difficult for a myriad of reasons. But still, that has to be the expectation.

The absolute best way to handle this is by looking ahead proactively and preparing the work for the production crews. Each workgroup needs a daily schedule prepared and printed the day before on what they will be working on. For example, if you have four automatic presses and two manuals, each press will get their own written schedule printed the day before.

The jobs should be listed in the sequence that they need to be completed. A good rule of thumb to use is Rush, Late, Today, Tomorow. Before your Production manager leaves today, every job for each workgroup needs to be pulled and staged for tomorrow. With that sequence in mind.
Jobs are lined up neatly.

For Screen-printing, all shirts, screens, inks, samples, and documents are staged this way. In Embroidery, it is the same but you should pull the cones of thread. This works the same for DTG, Heat Press or Dye Sublimation workgroups too.

The expectation is that each workgroup will produce what they are given before they leave for the day. The more understanding you have of your production team’s daily capacity and velocity, the better you will be at scheduling work for them. This takes practice and lots of metrics.

Another mandatory expectation for Production is that all jobs will be produced with the highest quality possible. This means that PMS colors should match regardless of the shirt color or if the image uses an underbase. The decoration should not be off-center or crooked. Embroidery work should be neat and clean with excess threads and stabilizer trimmed. Hoop marks should be steamed out.

Instructions written on the work order need to be followed. If your art proof shows that the image is to be 3″ down from the collar, your production worker can’t produce the job at 4″ just because “I’ve been in the industry for 15 years and I’ve always done it that way.”

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    Regardless of the decoration method, orders have to be produced.
    The most important piece of information for an order is the ship date. For production, this means scheduling the work so it is complete one business day before the job is supposed to leave the building.
    The expectation is that Production will do what it takes to ensure that this is a reality. That often is difficult for a myriad of reasons. But still, that has to be the expectation.
    The absolute best way to handle this is by looking ahead proactively and preparing the work for the production crews. Each workgroup needs a daily schedule prepared and printed the day before on what they will be working on. For example, if you have four automatic presses and two manuals, each press will get their own written schedule printed the day before.
    The jobs should be listed in the sequence that they need to be completed. A good rule of thumb to use is Rush, Late, Today, Tomorow. Before your Production manager leaves today, every job for each workgroup needs to be pulled and staged for tomorrow. With that sequence in mind.
    Jobs are lined up neatly.
    For Screen-printing, all shirts, screens, inks, samples, and documents are staged this way. In Embroidery, it is the same but you should pull the cones of thread. This works the same for DTG, Heat Press or Dye Sublimation workgroups too.
    The expectation is that each workgroup will produce what they are given before they leave for the day. The more understanding you have of your production team’s daily capacity and velocity, the better you will be at scheduling work for them. This takes practice and lots of metrics.
    Another mandatory expectation for Production is that all jobs will be produced with the highest quality possible. This means that PMS colors should match regardless of the shirt color or if the image uses an underbase. The decoration should not be off-center or crooked. Embroidery work should be neat and clean with excess threads and stabilizer trimmed. Hoop marks should be steamed out.
    Instructions written on the work order need to be followed. If your art proof shows that the image is to be 3″ down from the collar, your production worker can’t produce the job at 4″ just because “I’ve been in the industry for 15 years and I’ve always done it that way.”